Week #2

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Well doesn't time fly!

And here we are on week 2. I have exciting news but that will come in later weeks, can't be counting chickens before they hatch. 

Last weekend my New York fam and I went to Six Flags in Jackson, NJ. It was insane. If you want f*** off rollercoasters with no frills attached (kind of like the Pak 'n' Save of theme parks) this is the place to go. My eyeballs felt like rocks after riding Kingda-Ka (i.e 128mph/205kph in 3.5 seconds, also shown on the video).

Click here to skip to Shenanigans. Have a great week my friends.

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1. The Past - ancient times and Urban legends

VENICE aka.

the city of bridges, canals and water

The City of Venice has its roots in the 5th century A.D after the fall of the Western Roman Empire. Its populace hailed from the Northern Roman territories who were fleeing successions of Germanic and Hun invasions. They escaped to the nearby marshes and built their homes on the sandy islands of Torcello, Iesolo and Malamocco. With an enemy heavily reliant on horseback, their surrounds of a gigantic moat was a clever defense.

but how does it float?

The foundations consist of wooden piles that were placed very closely together. To prevent the silt from rising, stone and rock was thrown between the piles. On top of the piles they constructed wooden platforms that their buildings were then built upon. Marble was also the preferred choice of masonry as it is impermeable to water.

 

Example illustration of the wooden piles, packed closely together.

Example illustration of the wooden piles, packed closely together.

To many of us fully submerged wooden foundations sound particularly unreliable but there is a secret that the "Queen of the Adriatic" holds. Due to the fact that the piles are completely underwater, they are not exposed to oxygen, thus are not able to decay as microorganisms (fungi, bacteria) need oxygen to survive. Additionally the unique mix of silts and salt from the lagoon petrified the wood at an accelerated pace over time. 

Over time the city became a wealthy financial centre and economic hub with merchants trading silk, grains and spice. It's architectural history and current presence is directly indicative of the mix of cultures that frequented the city. 

Take Piazza San Marco as an example.

A Byzantine cathedral (St Mark's Basilica) which is connected to the Doge's palace. 

 

Bronze lions, from the Tang dynasty signify the influence of Imperialism.

Bronze horses above the Arch of Constantine were originally from the Hippodrome in Constantinople.

The original horses have now been moved inside. 

The original horses have now been moved inside. 

Islamic influences adorn the doges palace through inflected arches on the main facade. 

*sigh* this is only the tip of the iceberg, perhaps there will have to be a Venice Part II...

 

2. press play and enjoy some classical music

Another personal favourite, Fredrick Chopin's Nocturne, in C# Minor. 

 

3. An architectural model

Spotted at Richard Meier's Model Workshop in NJ (New Jersey) is the Getty Museum complex in Los Angeles. (I highly recommend visiting). 

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The real deal in Los Angeles.

The real deal in Los Angeles.

 

4. Lost in Translation

Torch(NZ/AUS/UK) = Flashlight (USA)

If I ever ask you for a torch, don't look at me like I'm asking you to give me baton of flames.

 

5. a bit of old and a bit of new 

The Reina Sofia by

ateliers jean nouvel

LOCATION: Calle de Santa Isabel, 52, 28012 Madrid, Spain

 

The Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía is a perfect mix of old and new, or as an archy nerd may refer to as a, regeneration project. The museum is sited on Madrid's first General Hospital, and the older portion of the building was designed by José de Hermosilla and later Francisco Sabatini during the reign of King Ferdinand VI.

In 1992, the building was officially re-purposed as a museum. It houses predominantly Spanish artists, and is home to Pablo Picasso's Guernica.

In 2005, the 8000 m2 (86,000 ft2) designed by Ateliers Jean Nouvel, a French Architect, opened its doors to the public. 

Bright red (Jean Nouvel-esque) Aluminum Composite Panels adorn the underside of an impressive floating canopy, that hovers next to the existing museum. 

The museum from above, on the left you can see the new extension and the existing building on the right.

The museum from above, on the left you can see the new extension and the existing building on the right.

A section of the new portion of the Reina Sofia with the existing building in the background on the right. On the left we can see the section cut through an auditorium.

A section of the new portion of the Reina Sofia with the existing building in the background on the right. On the left we can see the section cut through an auditorium.

Skylights cut into the new canopy, just outside the entrance. 

Skylights cut into the new canopy, just outside the entrance. 

Pablo Picasso's Guernica.

Pablo Picasso's Guernica.

6. is this real life?

CGI Rendering by Forbes Massie, of Nodeul Island by Serie Architects.

 

7. the present - a Personal building favourite

None other than SHoP Architect's Pier 15 wharf building. Completed 2011, the pier protrudes out just far enough to clear you out of earshot from the FDR. Great for a post workout shavasana on the sparse grass patches, or watching tourists take selfies.

Image from SHoP architects.

Image from SHoP architects.

Brooklyn

 

8. sick of classical?

In ode to Blade Runner (2046) that was just released on Thursday, I present to you NJ badass, Frank Sinatra's One for My Baby (and One More for the Road).

So how was Blade Runner you ask? Well not going to lie, I may have taken a quick ten timeout where Gosling places his hand in the beehive... But it's beautiful watch and a great cinema experience, just really long. Also the trailer vastly over sells the amount of action you actually see in the movie.

This video is particularly amazing, as Sinatra is holding a beer and smoking a cigarette whilst singing. 

 

9. Architectural Spotlight

Zaha Hadid

Pritzker prize winner 2004, is an Iraqi-British architect who sadly passed away last year (aged 65), March 31st 2016. Her work was always at the forefront of the architectural field, but also encompassed the realms of fashion, product and furniture design. Personally I've seen two Zaha projects, a bridge in Zaragoza and the Tondonia Wine Pavilion in the La Rioja region. It was immediately apparent that the progressive spaces and unique form finding was the work of an incredible mind.

Since her passing, Patrik Schumacher (apparently called Pikachu by Zaha over the office speakers) has taken the reigns. Schumacher a German architect and theorist is the author responsible for the "autopoiesis of architecture" a book touted by some as a bible of contemporary architectural theory and others as a mammoth read (of 1200 pages) which needs severe editing. I think for now I'll stick with Harry Potter no.4.

 

The Vitra Fire Station, Weil am Rhein, Germany (1993) / image by Christian Richters

The Vitra Fire Station, Weil am Rhein, Germany (1993) / image by Christian Richters

Heydar Aliev Center in Baku, Azerbaijan, completed 2012.

Heydar Aliev Center in Baku, Azerbaijan, completed 2012.

London Aquatic Center, completed 2012, opened to the public in 2014. (Did have issues during the olympics with some seats not being able to see the pool...)

London Aquatic Center, completed 2012, opened to the public in 2014. (Did have issues during the olympics with some seats not being able to see the pool...)

She was also a phenomenal drawer and painter.

She was also a phenomenal drawer and painter.


shenanigans

1. canine friends

Exhibit A: Rusty aka Rustman, the rust, sophisticated-urban-animal; Pomeranian rescue, from Tulsa (he only has 3 legs). Should be noted that he is NOT a soft toy, cranky at times but maintains peak dog status due to Millie's spontaneous brain explosions.

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rusty

Exhibit B: Millie aka Stinky, Stinkers, Millhouse; rescue pup from North Carolina. Has occassional brain explosions and is extremely greedy, so much so she would probably eat herself to death.

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stinky

 

 

2. Babe

... of the summer, goes to Wonder Woman Gal Gadot. So not to be stink, but Wonder Woman is actually a far cry from my favourite super hero but babe status nevertheless.

 

3. Space invader of OSCAR NIERMEYER'S Museu de Arte Contemporânea

by me

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4. Boy

The young Rob Lowe. (Yes the young Rob Lowe).

 

Not to be mistaken for the old Rob Lowe.

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5. stair porn

That's right, lap up that stair porn; because it's real life. Friends, meet The Vessel, the closest we'll probably get to Escher and it's being built right NOW. Designed by Thomas Heatherwick Studios, the beehive/vessel whatever you want to call it, is big time New York developer, Related's $150 million staircase, sitting in the center of Hudson Yards. 

I was chatting to the surveyor a few weeks back and there is only a 1-2mm joint tolerance between each of the metal panels.

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6. Art

Still working on securing an interview with this Aussie artist, but CJ Hendry has been killing the contemporary market. And after being spotted by Kanye it was all over rover. Her graphic pen works are truly exquisite and unique. 

 

7. object

When I was little I loved a soft boiled egg/ig (apparently how I pronounce it to Americans) with soldiers (thin strips of toasted bread with butter). Now I just do away with the unsophisticated shot glass to double as my egg cup holder. But these architectural egg/ig cups by Kikkerland are egg-pic! (I'm laughing at my own joke right now).

 

8. Wanderlust

Molokini crater, Maui, USA.

 

9. harsh realities

I don't do well with gore and violence. In all honesty guns freak me out. So here is one picture from a NY Times article from last week.

10. doodle

 

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11. Quote of the Week

"I don't need a pen pal."

- by Aria, from Aria's friend, defining how she doesn't need a boy to text message.

 

12. LOL

For those of you who have instagram, you may be familiar with a certain profile @subwaycreatures - a collection of pure genius, bringing to light the craziness of public transport. Here is one that gets me EVERYTIME. VIDEO IS HERE.

 

13. NOM NOM NOM

Coming in at around $2.00-$4.00 per packet, depending whether you're buying from a New York deli or you've nabbed the shoprite 2-for-1 special the Doritos Hint of Lime are my kryptonite.

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Ok I guess that's not real food.

Here is a bowl of ramen from Zutto, one of my favourite places in TriBeCa.

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14. and that's a wrap! here's some 'new' music.

An acoustic cover of The Sound by The 1975. Video clip isn't much, (in fact it's an awkward watch) but it's a good cheeseballs tune that came up on my discover weekly.

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Till next week my friends. #dab-out.

I hope that I have credited everything. If not images are not mine unless stated, please click on the images and hyperlinks to their original sources :)